GAPS Almond Bread

by Ann Marie Michaels on May 28, 2008

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almond bread

Here is the recipe for the GAPS Almond Bread from Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride’s book, Gut and Psychology Syndrome.

This bread is really easy to make. Tonight I’m going to make some more to go with the butternut squash soup I’m making — and serve it with butter and roasted bone marrow. Either that or homemade tomato soup with grilled cheese.

Ideally you should soak it overnight to remove the phytic acid and make it more digestible. You can either soak your nuts and dehydrate then grind them OR if you buy almond meal, just soak it overnight in some kefir, whey or yogurt and warm water.

GAPS Almond Bread

Ingredients

Almond flour (2 1/2 cups)
Eggs (3) – where to buy
Softened butter or coconut oil, goose fat, chicken fat, duck fat, or homemade yogurt or creme fraiche, plus a little extra to grease the pan (1/4 cup ) — where to buy coconut oil

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
2. Grease a loaf pan or cookie sheet. Mix the almond flour, eggs, and fat in a bowl. Press the mixture into the greased loaf pan — or mold into a loaf shape on a cookie sheet.
3. Bake for about an hour. Test for doneness by inserting a clean butter knife — it will come out clean when it’s ready.
4. Let it rest for at least 10 minutes before using a butter knife to remove it from the pan.

You can also make different kinds of loaves by adding various ingredients. You could add a cheese or olives and rosemary or you could add some dates or honey to make it sweet. You can use it for pizza dough as well, and for muffins.

You can also make multiple loaves and freeze them.

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{ 64 comments… read them below or add one }

Henriette May 29, 2008 at 12:02 AM

Thank you :-D
sounds so good- and looks quite like the one I used to have.

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Christine Kennedy May 29, 2008 at 6:17 AM

Thanks Ann Marie,

I am definitely going to try this.

Christine :)

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Jessica Jones May 29, 2008 at 1:33 PM

That looks so easy! Thanks Ann Marie.

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Henriette June 1, 2008 at 1:21 AM

Very nice
- I used
2 1/4 cups almond meal
and 1/4 cup flax seed meal ( I ran out of almonds)
I used yoghurt ( 10 % fat) and it turned out well.
I think next time I´ll use a bit salt as well.

How do you store it best ?

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cheeseslave June 1, 2008 at 5:48 AM

Good! I’m glad it worked!

I just leave it in an airtight container on the counter. Seems to do fine for a few days. If you’re not going to eat it in a few days, I’d freeze it.

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Henriette June 1, 2008 at 12:43 PM

it is almost gone now ( blushing) :-)
it tasted so good- but a bit pricy- organic almonds costs
40 dollars pr kg ( 2 pounds) here in Denmark so that ammount of almonds is not a every day thing

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cheeseslave June 1, 2008 at 1:32 PM

Yes it is expensive here too — although I think not that expensive (can’t remember what I paid for it).

The GAPS diet is not cheap! But it is not forever….

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Lauren July 6, 2008 at 6:12 PM

I was looking for a simple low carb bread recipe and this seems like a good one to try! Great blog. I’m a huge fan of Weston Price/whole foods eating, and formulate my recipes to adhere to those principles like you seem to. Happy eating!:)

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cheeseslave July 6, 2008 at 6:42 PM

Hi, Lauren, yeah the almond bread comes out pretty decent. Almonds are expensive so it’s not cheap to make though.

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Ellie Raduns June 18, 2009 at 3:56 PM

Thanks so much for sharing this recipe. I am really looking forward to trying it!
I have a son who is allergic to almost all starches…except millet and oats. I have had lots of exciting experiments with quinoa, buckwheat etc, but no success with a tasty bread/pizza dough!

I am definitely going to give this a try! Thank you for all your work on these recipes!

Ellie Raduns’s last blog post..Sugary and Not So Sugary Problems

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Catherine July 29, 2009 at 10:49 AM

Hi Annmarie!

I had a question about soaking almonds and almond flour overnight before baking with it. I have heard this before but have never done it yet I do have trouble digesting baked goods made from almond flour. I have been cooking with it for awhile because I have Celiac. I am also lactose intolerant so my question is if I am baking the almond bread with almond flour, is there anything else I could soak the almond flour in overnight besides yogurt and water or do you think that the yogurt won’t absorb into the almond flour? Thanks so much!

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kelly May 26, 2013 at 1:30 PM

hope this is helpful to you, I soak my almonds in either salted water or you can add a bit of apple cider vinegar…I’ve actually never used yogurt before.

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Cat September 15, 2009 at 10:31 AM

Do you know if you can soak almond flour if the recipe doesn’t call for liquids to soak it in? I buy almond flour in bulk but still have some problems digesting it. The almonds were blanched but not soaked in it. Do you know if you can soak almond flour and how? Thanks!

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Allison November 10, 2009 at 7:17 PM

After the flour is soaked, do you rinse it? Is the phytic acid broken down? What does it become?

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Allison November 19, 2009 at 1:10 PM

I made this bread with raw dill cheese. It was good but I used NOW almond flour/meal and it was to coarse to stick together. No loss, now it’s stuffing or salad/soup topping. I made the best stuffing with steamed new potatoes, carrots, red bell pepper, onion and zucchini sauted in bacon drippings and butter with some of the almond bread crumbs. I added the crumbled bacon and seasalt. Yum! I like the crumbs on beef broth too.

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Renaee January 19, 2010 at 7:19 AM

I want to know about the soaking of almond meal if the recipe calls for dry ingredients as well, won’t the soaking make it too wet? Or do you drain the soak liquid out?

Anyone…

I know that making your own crispy nuts and grinding them up is a solution to make them more digestible, but if you don’t have a dedhyrator or a grinder/food processor, it is much easier to just buy almond meal.

Many thanks,
Renaee.

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Kim January 27, 2010 at 12:53 PM

Some of the above comments are older but I wanted to share what I tried in regards to soaking almond flour.

We can not do any dairy so I soaked the almond meal (I got mine at Trader Joes for under $3 for about 4 cups) overnight in water and lemon juice (I’ve also read you can use apple cider vinegar). I used just enough water to soak but not so much that it sat on top of the water. I did not rinse or pour any off in the morning.

The bread was great. It was much moister and fluffier than the previous loaf I made when I didn’t soak the almond meal.

The other trick I used was separating the eggs. I beat the egg whites until fluffy and then folded them into the mixture before spreading in the loaf pan. I think this helps things rise when you can’t use baking powder or baking soda.

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cheeseslave February 2, 2011 at 10:34 AM

Thanks so much for the update, Kim!

Yes, if I were making almond bread regularly, I would soak the almond flour overnight in something acidic such as water and lemon juice or water/vinegar.

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cheeseslave February 2, 2011 at 10:35 AM

Thanks so much for the update, Kim!

Yes, if I were making almond bread regularly, I would soak the almond flour overnight in something acidic such as water and lemon juice or water/vinegar.

Wonderful tip on the eggs!

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olivia March 10, 2010 at 7:46 PM

I thought that to deactivate enzyme inhibitors present in nuts (apparently more of a problem than phytic acid in nuts) you to need to soak nuts with salt as in the crispy nut recipe of Nourishing Traditions. So is it ok to soak in yohurt, whey or kefir? This would remove the small amount of phytic acid but would it remove enzyme inhibitors?

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Karen February 2, 2011 at 9:52 AM

Great questions about the soaking, but too bad there are no answers.

You wonder why almond flour would need to be soaked the way grains would need to be soaked and not the way NUTS need to be soaked…

I, too, have purchased almond meal but find digestion problems when eating it, so DO want to soak the almond flour; just not sure how….

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cheeseslave February 2, 2011 at 10:37 AM

Karen

I think you could use warm filtered water and salt, but you could also use warm filtered water and something acidic (see Kim’s post above). Maybe try it both ways and see which works better for you.

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Karen February 4, 2011 at 5:32 PM

Thanks for responding. I’m just wondering how I’d soak the commercial flour for this almond bread recipe that only calls for the melted butter (1/4 cup, tho i do see you could use yogurt…)?

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cheeseslave February 4, 2011 at 6:08 PM

Why not use warm filtered water and salt — or added whey?

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Karen February 4, 2011 at 7:55 PM

OH! I thank you so much for replying again as I want to make this for our Super Bowl eats on Sunday and I’m frantically searching the internet on the “how” of soaking almond flour.

my question is ‘how much’ of the liquid (since the bread recipe only calls for 1/4 c butter, melted?

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cheeseslave February 4, 2011 at 8:47 PM

I am not sure… the only way I have ever done it is to soak the almonds in water and salt, the way Sally Fallon Morell recommends in Nourishing Traditions. If you have time to do it. I’d do it that way.

Soak overnight, then dry in a dehydrator.

http://www.ehow.com/how_2166338_soaked-almond-flour.html

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cheeseslave February 4, 2011 at 8:48 PM

you could probably do the same thing w/ almond flour

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Karen February 4, 2011 at 9:48 PM

This is my thought… if you were to make flour with your own almonds, you’d soak the almonds in salt. so why would we soak the almond flour (commercially made) in an acidic medium? why wouldnt we soak commercial almond flour in salt water? but then, to make ‘crispy nuts’, you pour off the salt/soaking water………

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cheeseslave February 5, 2011 at 7:43 AM

I think it would probably work to soak almond flour in salt water — the only thing is I don’t know how you would then drain the liquid from the flour. I guess you could rinse it and then dehydrate it.

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Karen February 5, 2011 at 9:59 AM

What do you think, tho? Doesnt that make more sense that almond flour be soaked like nuts instead of like grains? My google search is not getting me any more answers. It won’t happen this weekend, tho, for this recipe, as I’m out of town and wanted to have my daughter start it for me Saturday… Will have to keep researching….

cheeseslave February 5, 2011 at 12:10 PM

If I were eating a lot of almond flour, I would make my own by soaking (in water/salt) and drying the almonds then grinding into flour.

If you already have the almond flour, you can soak it in the salt water solution, then rinse and dehydrate it.

jules July 29, 2011 at 6:08 AM

Nuts and grains are completely different structures, that is why they are soaked differently. Nuts in salt and grains in an acidic medium. For example in sprouting seeds, the soaking days differ between each seed. This area we are all in is very detailed. I have now soaked the almond flour the same way as soaking whole nuts – using salt, not an acidic medium. If one uses an acidic medium, then it breaks the ‘nutmeal’ or flour down and softens it and that makes it blend better (more surface area) with the rest of recipe ingredients. This is the problem: you loose 50% of the almond flour or nutmeal and end up with almond milk with the other 50%. I have recipe books that do this and yes, the leftover wet almond meal can be used along with other flours such as coconut flour, etc but it does not work well in recipes such as from Elana’s Pantry. This is because when soaking the almonds we have made it more bioavailable but we lost a good amount of fat and from my testing it in recipes – it won’t blend well when it’s the only flour in the recipe. I have even pureed the soaked almond meal and it doesn’t matter. Bottom line is that if you make your own almond milk and then use the leftover wet almond meal (do not dehyrdrate for a recipe – it won’t blend) with other flours in a recipe – that is easier to digest. If you don’t drink almond milk, then one has to consider the cost. It’s a catch here: to make the almonds more bioavailable one has to soak (dehydrate if so choosing) them and yet then the almonds or almond flour do not blend well in a recipe if it’s the only flour. Hope this helps.

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jules August 22, 2012 at 8:29 AM

Update: I found that using the salt wasn’t of any help in making the nuts easier on digestion. Then I discovered soaking them in water, in the oven on lowest temp overnight did make them bioavailable. You have to dehydrate them or slowly bake in oven after soaking. You do lose flavor and they contain less fat – which is good for our digestive system. I have found adding some salt, spices, etc while dehydrating or baking helps.

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Ceej October 11, 2012 at 12:11 AM

Just made this with some almond meal that I had from making (soaked) almond milk. I used 50% coconut flour as per comment from jules about mixing with another flour for blending. Sadly it did not work out for me. I got a pan full of crumbles but I was just experimenting as I did also use coconut oil for a fat (butter would have been much nicer a choice but I’m afraid I’m going to have to cut out dairy until I heal my gut). I will try again with almond flour, butter and eggs next time and report back on how happy I am that I followed a recipe for once and it came out delish!

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Jeanmarie August 11, 2013 at 10:08 PM

Hi Ceej,
Coconut flour can’t be substituted one-for-one for other flours. It is very dense and absorbs a lot of liquid. You also need to use lots of eggs. Try 1/4 c. coconut flour to replace a cup of other flour, and add more eggs and possibly more liquid. Somewhere I found a rule of thumb for how many eggs per so much coconut flour but I can’t remember exactly, sorry. I think another blogger in Village Green Network did a post on it, though.

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julie weidinger May 30, 2011 at 2:53 AM

Hello all – I, too, am at this very moment, soaking blanched almond flour, as I do not digest it well either. There is not very much phytic acid in nuts – so no need to soak in an acidic medium – waste of time; use the salt as it activates the enzymes that help deactivate the enzyme inhibitors per Sally Fallon; my recipe does not call for any water, so after 24 hours I am going to put the soaked flour in a tea towel, let it have a bit of room to spread out and then tie at the end and then run under water to rinse it; this way I shouldn’t lose any flour, just keep turning the tied tea towel around under the water or use a bowel of water; then just squeeze excess water out with hands; maybe use some kitchen towels and put tea towel in between and press more water out if needed. I am not going to dehydrate this time – just use within 2 – 3 days in recipe, keeping in fridge until then. This is my first time using it in a recipe – and I may make the bread above and let all of you know. Hope this gives some ideas now.

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julie weidinger June 1, 2011 at 6:38 AM

Update: My experiment did produce an almond flour that reduced the fat content and is more bioavailable . . . but the soaking did such a good job of breaking down in that I used 1 cup of almond flour and ended up with 1/2 cup after squeezing the water out. But this did tell me that soaking/dehydrating/grinding for flour would be to an advantage for digestion. I am going to take the 1/2 cup I ended up with and make a small batch of cookies and see how it bakes – let you know. Also, when squeezing the liquid out, I did have almond milk, but because of the salt that is needed, the milk was too salty too drink.

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paisley July 1, 2011 at 2:18 PM

Yours looks so fluffy and almost like “store bread” – Mine always looks more like a brick! I’ll have to try it again.

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Karen A. July 5, 2011 at 9:46 AM

This was the first recipe I tried after I found your site. It was delicious and had a shortbread like consistency. I made little pb&j sandwiches with apple butter for snacks.

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leighann July 6, 2011 at 4:28 AM

Is there a way to make almond flour at home? I’d like to soak and dehydrate the nuts first, but I don’t have a grain grinder. What would you suggest?

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jules July 29, 2011 at 6:21 AM

It’s easy to find out how to soak and dehydrate online. You will need to buy a nut mill and either use your oven or buy a dehydrator. The problem so far that I have run in to is that the nuts are now more bioavailable but the soaked/dehydrated almond flour does not blend well in recipes that call for only almond flour. If you do soak the almond flour, keep in fridge and use it within 2 – 3 days or it will mold. I have not tried freezing it yet. But as I said in a previous posting – you loose 50% of your almond flour by soaking and I do not drink almond milk which is the other 50%.

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jules August 22, 2012 at 8:21 AM

I have found with all the time it takes in making your own almond flour . . . just easier to buy from HONEYVILLE – it’s not organic from what I see, but you can get the blanched or regular flour and I agree with other poster in using the blanched don’t have to worry about phytic acids. Also their flour is ground the finest from the places I have tried so far. I also have used blanched flour from BENEFIT YOUR LIFE – it is organic and ground almost as fine as the above company – bit more expensive.

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LeahS July 11, 2011 at 1:19 PM

That bread looks so tasty! I bet it’s great for dipping in soup!

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sewpretty13 July 14, 2011 at 2:01 PM

I’m amazed that it looks so light without the baking soda or baking powder. Remind me again why GAPS doesn’t use the leavening’s?

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Alisue July 20, 2011 at 7:19 AM

I haven’t tried Almond Flour bread yet, will try it soon….

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Chris Paulic August 23, 2011 at 5:57 AM

Did you use a small loaf pan? This recipe barely coverd the bottom of mine. I feel like I should have doubled it for a standard loaf size? Any suggestions? I’m looking for a bread to make sandwiches with for school lunches. Thank you!

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Josh June 10, 2012 at 1:05 AM

Hi

I buy almond flour (blanched almonds) not the meal (which has the skin on) from the Aussie GAPS site and it mentions that you don’t have to soak it as the phytic acid is in the skins, which has been removed. So, for those wanting to keep things simpler, try the blanched almond flour.

Thanks for the recipe. Will try it this week :-)

Josh.

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Toria July 24, 2012 at 11:10 PM

I just made this almond bread and it is amazing! The house smells delicious and it was super easy to make (gotta’ love a bread that needs no knead!).
Thanks for posting this recipe, keep up the good work!

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Toni Sherman August 6, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Hi,
I made the almond bread, except I didn’t have almonds on hand and used ground sunflower seeds instead. I cooked it in my toaster oven for 30 minutes and it was done. It is awesomely tasty too!

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Cheryl Crawford August 20, 2012 at 10:03 PM

Just wanted to thank you for all the recipes! My family has been on GAPS for one month now and you are one of my go-to websites! And – cheese is my favorite food! I do miss the crackers, but you have helped me fill in the GAPS! LOL! :)

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Amy December 7, 2012 at 7:44 PM

This made my husband so happy! He said it was the first time he felt full in weeks :-) Thanks!!!

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molly b January 11, 2013 at 4:47 PM

I just made this for the first time. I soaked the flour in salt and warm water over night (as per the discussion in the comments). Then I just added the other ingredients even though the flour was wet like pancake batter from the soaking and added water. It turned out GREAT!! It rose and was moist and delicious! Our family (all 8 of us) is doing GAPS Intro and this was raved about by all! YUM!

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Leslie August 21, 2013 at 8:42 PM

How much water and salt? Did you drain it?

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Faye February 17, 2013 at 11:13 PM

Can hazelnut flour be a sub for the almond flour? Some in my family cannot have almonds.

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Fallon February 18, 2013 at 10:10 PM

Would this bread still turn out if I use an egg replacer? Egg allergy :(

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