Interview with Lynne Farrow, Author of The Iodine Crisis (Part 1)

by Ann Marie Michaels on July 11, 2013

Print Friendly

Interview Lynne Farrow

This is part one of a two-part interview.

Lynne Farrow is the author of the important new book, The Iodine Crisis: What You Don’t Know About Iodine Can Wreck Your Life.

Lynne answered some of my questions about the book and her experience recovering from breast cancer with iodine in this two-part interview.

Interview with Lynne Farrow, Author of The Iodine Crisis

1. How did you get so interested in iodine?

You know how you hear about chance meetings where you bump into someone at an event and they change your life? That’s what happened to me. I attended an integrative medicine conference just like many others and there was a break between presentations. Dr. Sherri Tenpenny saw from my conference ID badge that I represented a breast cancer organization so she asked me if I had ever heard of iodine for breasts.

I told her I’d only heard about for benign breast disease. But at this point I was kind of insulted that she would mention something so simple-minded for breast cancer. Did she really think I hadn’t looked into every single nutritional strategy? I had been running Breast Cancer Choices and researching constantly with the best minds in integrative medicine. Surely, if there was anything to iodine I would have heard about it, right? Wrong! No, seriously. I couldn’t have been more wrong.

Only because I knew Dr. Tenpenny as a respected vaccine activist did I research further when I returned home. I set aside a couple of weeks to research. That turned into several years and a partnership with many iodine activists. That turned into my book.

2. How were you diagnosed with breast cancer?

First, I need to say by the time I was diagnosed with breast cancer I had been plagued with fatigue, headaches and brain fog for many years. I medicated myself with caffeine and prescription painkillers along with migraine medicine. I had consulted dozens of specialists.

Benign breast disease had dogged me on and off for a long time. FBD (fibrocystic breast disease) is an umbrella term for various breast conditions that cause swelling, cysts or pain. Every time I had a mammogram they said not to worry because FBD was normal. I’d ask, “How can something with benign as its first name and disease as its last name be normal?” They’d shrug and say, “It’s normal because it’s so common.” What?

Then the mammographers started finding cysts which they would stick with a needle to withdraw and examine the fluid. I’m ashamed to say I never questioned this. I assumed they knew what they were doing — a flawed assumption I would make several times on my healing journey.

On one of these fluid aspirations, the needle withdrew tissue that lead to a cancer diagnosis.

3. What did you do after your diagnosis of breast cancer?

The first thing I did was locate a respected surgeon at a NY breast cancer center. She made recommendations of surgery and radiation. She then referred me to an oncologist who recommended chemotherapy because the pathology report showed the cancer was aggressive. But I wasn’t about to rush into anything.

Secondly, since I was trained as an academic, I asked a lot of questions. I wanted to verify the sources of the doctors’ information. I looked every recommendation up in the medical journals.

I was shocked to find the sources were filled with fuzzy math and little info on what benefits treatments provide in terms of survival. Then I discovered the doctors have official treatment guidelines they follow. They put each patient on that treatment treadmill. Legally, that’s their job.

I chose to have surgery but I refused chemotherapy and radiation because there wasn’t enough convincing evidence in the medical literature that either would prolong my life. I realize others would make different decisions.

4. Did you work with an integrative doctor?

Yes, in the midst of the decision making, I worked with an integrative doctor and began several non-standard approaches. Those strategies have evolved over the years. I was also determined to use the same evidence standard with him that I did with the conventional doctors. I looked everything up.

I met a lot of other breast cancer patients online and we exchanged notes about looking things up in the online medical libraries. The main part of my education came down to learning what questions to ask.

5. How did you learn what questions to ask?

Just by reading the medical literature, learning the vocabulary and standards for medical proof. It wasn’t that hard. I bounced my criteria off a few doctors to make sure I was getting the questions right.

Then I and a couple of my online friends realized these essential questions and answers weren’t available to patients anywhere. That’s why we founded Breast Cancer Choices.

When I stumbled onto iodine thanks to my chance meeting with Dr. Tenpenny, I discovered a revolutionary perspective on iodine deficiency leading to benign disease progressing to breast cancer. Iodine wasn’t just another nutrient that was “good for you.” If scientists could create breast tumors in animals by blocking iodine in their chow, maybe an underlying cause of breast disease progressing could be identified and remedied.

Iodine became my “first line” strategy to keep me in remission from cancer. So far, so good. The experience of most of my online iodine-taker friends with a history of breast cancer parallels mine.

Does iodine cure cancer? Even though iodine reports have been encouraging, nothing has been proved to 100% cure cancer. I’m told by reliable sources that formal clinical trials are in the planning stages at research facilities.

The Iodine Crisis: What You Don't Know About Iodine Can Wreck Your Life

6. So how did you start taking iodine?

I took a few Lugol’s Iodine drops once in a while over the years but I never understood it and never noticed any difference.

Only when I took the 24 hour Urinary Iodine Loading test to evaluate me for iodine deficiency did I really start taking iodine. The morning of the test, I took 50 mg of Iodoral Iodine tablets and began collecting my urine. Within two hours my mind cleared and I felt a burst of well-being and energy.

7. Did you take the companion nutrients? And why are they important?

No, at that point I didn’t know anything about companion nutrients or the salt loading detox formula. This was early on in the iodine movement. The official Iodine Protocol was only released a year or so later at the two iodine conferences.

Because I didn’t know about the companion nutrients, I took too much iodine too fast and experienced what we now understand to be bromide detoxification. Back then, my response was just to take less Iodoral and build up slowly. That worked. I knew when I took too much because I would get brain fog and fatigue.

8. What are the “companion nutrients” that we should take along with iodine and why are they so important?

The companion nutrients are selenium, Vitamin C, magnesium, Vitamin B2 and B3, and unprocessed salt.

In a nutshell, the companion nutrients help get iodine into the cells and get the toxins that iodine purges out of the cells.

9. Why have we become iodine deficient in the past few decades?

Three reasons. First, our iodine consumption has dropped since the 1970s because iodine has been removed as a fortifying nutrient from wheat flour and replaced with an anti-iodine chemical in the bromine family, bromate.

Secondly, since the 1970s, bromines, the anti-iodine which purges iodine, has been added to furniture, electronics, cars, baby pajamas and mattresses—to name just a few sources. Bromines are present in foods and drugs also, but the main source is when we breathe in the dust from fire retardants.

Bromines compete with iodine for the same receptors in the body. So, if you’re not getting iodine, bromine will bully its way onto the receptor and you will become what we call, Bromide Dominant.

So even if you eat a clean, whole foods, organic diet, bromine exposure is unavoidable in the 21st century. We can eat like our grandparents but they didn’t have to deal with exposure to environmental toxins so eating clean is not enough. The only defense is to take iodine so that the environmental bromines can’t win.

This battle applies to fluoride also since all the elements in the halide family will jump into the competition for the same receptors.

Third, the unsubstantiatied medical advice to avoid salt keeps people from getting even the most minimal iodine.

10. Besides breast cancer, what other diseases or health problems are caused by iodine deficiency?

There is a long list of generally acknowledged iodine-deficiency health problems. I cover the list in my book, The Iodine Crisis.

But the fascinating thing is that we learn of more iodine deficiency conditions every day because people will take iodine for one thing, and then report a problem they thought was totally unrelated to iodine goes away. Several of these cases are reported in The Iodine Crisis.

Since the book was published, more people have contacted me with reports on conditions nobody thought had any relationship to iodine. In the last week, I’ve had reports on Autism symptoms improving as well as Myasthenia Gravis. Nobody is sure yet how iodine works on most of these conditions.

Order The Iodine Crisis

Click here to order a copy of The Iodine Crisis by Lynne Farrow.

Check back next week for Part 2 of this interview.

Disclosure: cmp.ly/4 and cmp.ly/5

{ 41 comments… read them below or add one }

Carrie Willard July 11, 2013 at 8:27 AM

Wow. My mom is a breast cancer survivor, and she has intense cravings for salt. She also has hypothyroidism that doesn’t resolve with thyroid meds. I’m passing this info along.

Reply

Lynn Razaitis July 11, 2013 at 8:48 AM

Hi Carrie
You can also direct your mom to http://breastcancerchoices.org/ and it’s online discussion group http://breastcancerchoices.org/discussion.html. I think she’ll find both very useful.
Lynn Razaitis

Reply

anja July 11, 2013 at 9:58 AM

oh, thank God for iodine! it has helped significantly reduce my thyroid antibodies, helped put pep back in my step, lifted my up out of the most severe depression i can imagine, and overall improved my health, on so many levels! i take 125 mg daily, making sure to also take all the companion nutrients, and plan on taking iodine for the rest of my life. thank you, lynne, for your years of research and putting it into a simple to understand, cohesive book for the general public. anja

Reply

Michael Gissibl, HHP July 11, 2013 at 10:47 AM

Iodine/iodide has profoundly changed my life. I am thankful to the pioneers who have ignited the re-introduction of iodine back into the body. I recommend it.

Reply

Stephanie Buist, ND HC July 11, 2013 at 10:49 AM

Iodine literally saved my life. I was dx’d with papillary thyroid cancer in March 2000 and proceeded to have my thyroid removed and then receive 3 rounds of radioactive iodine ablations (RAI) over the next 5 years. After a 4th recurrence I sought the help of Dr David Brownstein (one of the Iodine doctors) who helped me to heal naturally with Iodoral in high doses and the Iodine protocol. I now instruct others to do what I did through the Yahoo Iodine group and private consultations in my naturopathic practice (I went back to school after experiencing natural healing). My story can be read in full by going to my About Page at the bottom – link to my blog. The message of the benefits of Iodine therapy are spreading. In 2007 when I took over the Iodine Yahoo group there were 1,700 members. As of today there are just under 7,850 members. Iodine is not dangerous as many doctors tell their patients. It is life giving and important for the entire body – not just the thyroid gland.

Reply

Rich July 11, 2013 at 12:40 PM

Great interview! I just started iodine a few weeks ago – I like what it has done for my energy level. And I’ve felt an increased ability to concentrate. I’m taking the companion nutrients, and the detox reaction has been minimal.

Reply

monica July 11, 2013 at 1:29 PM

Thanks for doing this interview!! I wanted to comment to say how profoundly iodine has helped me.

Since I started taking iodine, my cracking, painful, flaking dry skin is now normal, and heals so much faster. Several broken capillaries have disappeared. Acne scars have disappeared. My once random and irregular periods are becoming more regular and predicable each month. Period cramps and breast pain during my cycle are completely gone. My mood has lightened. My once cracking dry nails are now about twice as strong as they had been and my hair grows faster and shinier. I have more energy, and clearer thinking. Constipation is gone. I have had asthma for my whole life, and used to need inhalers every day. I haven’t needed one in a month now.

I can’t stress enough, research iodine! It’s an essential nutrient that for some reason has been forgotten about.

Reply

Tricia Fitzgerald July 11, 2013 at 4:50 PM

I can’t thank Lynne enough for all of her time, energy and research on iodine. I am a breast cancer survivor, went through the conventional treatment of chemo/radiation/Herceptin. Whereas I finished chemo & radiation last year I still suffered from terrible brain fog, fatigue, depression, etc! I started taking Iodoral 2 months ago and my brain fog cleared up almost immediately. My energy levels improved and continue to improve. Depression? Ha! I’m feeling good now and it is no longer an issue. I’m getting back to my BC (before cancer) life and enjoying it again. Iodine is a miracle! I could go on and on and I’ve only been on it for a couple of months. My goal is to get to the recommended 50mg for breast cancer survivors. Everyone should look into iodine – everyone would benefit.

Reply

Curt July 11, 2013 at 6:57 PM

I’m a 59 yr old guy, hypothyroid, some andropause, a life time of allergies probably triggered by being fed soy formula as a baby because I was colic which didn’t solve that issue says my poor mother. I was born in the Midwest where locally raised food is devoid of iodine. I’ve found iodine to help with is my thyroid support. I supplement with centroid and 50mg of iodorol daily. My TSH is just where I want it around 0.8 (I believe TSH under 1 is where we need it) and my hashi numbers are low. Being somewhat andropause I’m taking iodine to stretch out the function of my sex hormones by keeping the receptor sites free of fluoride, bromide and mercury. There’s no other protocol besides iodine to clear hormone receptor sites has been my reading. Unfortunately there’s no good tests or measures for poor hormone function vs better function post iodine besides your glucose / insulin test numbers but I haven’t done before vs after testing…

I also use iodine topically to clear up brown age patches and keritinoids. I apply lugals followed by fermented cod liver oil (D3+A) and my age spots stay at bay. I gave this iodine protocol to a friend with pre-cancer on his neck and it went away too.

Also I used lugals to heal a sore spot in my mouth next to a tooth that was acting like there was deep tenderness that my Dentist was concerned about. Lugals on a Qtip in the morning and night in my mouth on that spot and in a few weeks the tenderness went away.

Reply

susie July 11, 2013 at 8:41 PM

If I have Hashimoto’s can this help or hurt? Heard conflicting info. I would love to stop all meds. I appreciate any advise.

Reply

Andrea Smith July 12, 2013 at 1:37 AM

Me too!

Reply

anja July 12, 2013 at 2:50 AM

susie… i have hashi, and take 125 mg iodine. it’s critical for us hashi folk to make sure we get the companion nutrients, particularly selenium, with iodine. it has helped to lower my antibodies. do your research…get and read lynne’s book. i cannot urge you strongly enough to start with iodine, but the choice is yours.

iodine will not necessarily replace your thyroid meds, but will enhance them. if you are taking synthetic thyroid meds, talk to your doc about switching to natural dessicated thyroid (this is what i use). some docs are under the misunderstanding that a natural dessicated thyroid product cannot be used by hashi folks, for whatever reason. they are wrong.

Reply

Ann Marie Michaels July 12, 2013 at 5:25 AM

Lynne answers this question in part 2 of the interview — check back next week!

Reply

Curt July 12, 2013 at 6:51 AM

Giving the topic of Hashi being improved or worsened with iodine it’s due, I think it’s prudent to say that some folks may not improve. We’ve read reports of such, so I’d say the risk exists. Folks with Hasi need to be under the care of a good endocrine Dr and blood test frequently. I get my own blood testing done via life extension org, lef dot org. Hasi problem folks might get a before and several after iodine and frequently.

I think Lynne’s book describes what the “Iodine Dr’s” in their early days saw: TSH jump up in the first 45-60 days then come back down after 120 days (+/-) with Hasi patients. Fortunately I doni’t have Hasi and my TSH has stayed very low (0.8) where I want it along with my antibody numbers. But some folks who are in the “tail of the bell curve” may not be so lucky.

Just saying if you have/had problems it’s safer to blood test but know what TSH might do. Someone might comment re rTSH etc?

Anja is right per my reading and experience: iodine is a synergist, I still supplement centeriod and topical testosterone, but I’m expecting to be getting a bit more mileage out of my endocrine/sex hormone systems with iodine clearing out the toxics [bromide, fluoride, mercury].. I read that iodine does more than just clear out toxics so I suspect I’m understating it’s function.

BTW has the topic of dealing with bromide / mercury mobilization and symptoms come up here? This is a big deal and probably what folks complain about when start taking iodine. I’ve always avoided food likely to be tainted with mercury and luckily my body seemed to be a low carrier of bromide that even at 50mg I’ve never had detox symptoms but a lot of women report symptoms.

If there was a FAQ on how to start taking iodine my view is that iit should start with preparing your detox pathways BEFORE iodine. Dr Brownstein advocates whole-hog start with large doses approach, but he’s treating cancer and serious illness. I suspect a start slow, clean out your liver etc then ramp iodine makes more sense for the bromide and mercury loaded women. Pulse iodine on then off? Alternating with salt flushes? I’m guessing re the protocol. I never had any problems but some do. These are all good topics for the iodine groups on FB and with your practitioner.

Reply

BethanyWallin July 12, 2013 at 4:48 AM

I started taking Iodine about 10 years ago, and developed a tumor on my thyroid. At the time, I didn’t make any connection, because the doctors always told me I had normal thyroid levels. So, while I would be really excited to try this, because I definitely still have symptoms that would benefit from the therapy, I am a little hesitant. I had half of my thyroid removed because of the tumor, but am not on any meds. Any ideas?

Reply

Stephanie Buist, ND HC July 12, 2013 at 8:11 AM

Bethany – my hunch is that you would have developed a tumor regardless of whether you had taken iodine or not. Your dosage was probably in mcg amounts and not mg amounts that can result in healing. Iodine by nature cannot create mutated cells – which results in a tumor. Iodine normalizes DNA that results in something called apoptosis (or programmed cell death) of abnormal cells. If you have had a high exposure to toxic halides then you would be at risk for developing this tumor. Research shows that in those tumors that were studied, cancerous tumors resulted in a lower selenium and iodine level plus higher mercury than in those that were not cancerous. If you have mercury amalgams in your mouth this can be enough to create a thyroid tumor – especially when combined with low iodine and selenium. This deficiency is pretty much worldwide now. Other halides like bromide are a constant assault on our bodies too and take a toll in an iodine deficient state. Please join the iodine group (link can be found if you click on my name which takes you to my website where the group link can be found) where we discuss the protocol for using iodine.

Reply

Brittany July 12, 2013 at 3:05 PM

First of all, please pardon my ignorance on this subject. I am completely new to this iodine information. I have had thyroiditis in the past and I am constantly sluggish, cold, etc. All symptoms of hypothyroid, but clinically I’m not. I understand that normal levels for one person, may not be normal for another – but the past three doctors I’ve been to don’t seem to care since I fall into the “normal” range. Before coming upon this article, I read about taking Kelp. How does kelp compare to lugols or iodine tablets? I just started taking Kelp to see if I could perk myself up. I hope I am explaining this well enough for someone to understand. Again, please excuse my lack of knowledge. I’ve just begun this journey of research! Thanks in advance. 🙂

Reply

Kari July 12, 2013 at 3:44 PM

I have fibrocystic breast disease in one breast. I started using lugol’s transdermally, but even one drop of 2% (3mg) gives me a huge headache the next day. I can’t imagine taking 50mg!

Has anyone had headaches on so little? If so, how did you do this without headaches?

Reply

Curt July 12, 2013 at 7:01 PM

Hi Brittany, Lynne’s book and here and on the FB iodine site explain why kelp never was useful for US deficient folks for dosage reasons and post coal fired power plants polluting mercury into the sea and Fukushima filling the oceans with radiation it certainly isn’t a choice now. Most use iodorol. I’ve forgotten which issue is best treated with iodorol and which can be treated with lugals. I take iodorol but we have quarts of lugals here that I use for my age spots topically. If there’s some skin issue, it gets a few weeks worth of lugals dabbing. lol

TSH used to be normed to 3-5, now my latest blood test sheet shows the normal range to be 0.45 to 4.5. Mine is 0.8. Brittany your Dr problem is that they just aren’t holistic and kept abreast of thyroid research. For me, my TSH has to be that low for my extremities to be warm and feel energetic. If your TSH is higher and your hands are cold and Drs do nothing, this is why we’ve resorted to self treatment! Clinically you are hypo and need some armor and you’ll have to decide if you want to try iodine. Find a Dr to give you armor is my feeling. 90% of those who test are low iodine so why not take it? It’s a nutrient for us since we walked out from the sea where we used to get a lot more iodine and where our genes got tuned for high doses of iodine. Modern food sources have almost no iodine, even modern commercial milk. Seafood then milk used to be our best sources of iodine, now neither source are safe. Excepting true grass fed raw milk sources but few drink much of that. We stopped for other reasons, so I take iodorol to make up for it not being in our food supply.

Kari, I googled: iodine headaches
https://www.google.com/search?q=iodine+headache&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

See my above comment pondering whether we should be posting links to a FAQ on how to get started for those who seem to be toxic?? Surely there’s a how to detox FAQ while starting to take iodine?

Here’s a relevant link: http://curezone.com/forums/am.asp?i=899705

“The headache’s aren’t actually caused by Iodine or Iodide but the caused by the release of Bromide. Bromide is a nasty detox and almost always causes a headache … mostly frontal headache…salt loading, and pulse dosing (taking days off of taking Iodine to give your body a rest) will help.

Bromide (causes cancer) is in everything and you need to get it out of the body…the only way you can is by taking Iodine/Iodide.

Again, the headaches are cause by the release of BROMIDE…not from taking Iodine.”

Kari, sounds like you’ve got a body full of “stuff” that you need to get out. Fibrocystic maybe be just one issue in play that you know of has been my 2nd person observation over the course of many years. ;-\\ Google and read about iodine being probably the only protocol to bump bromide and mercury loose, then you have to cause it to pass out. I’m not being flippant, just sharing what I’ve read, observed 2nd person and experienced personally: you’re better off paying now with detox discomfort at this point in ones life.

Anyone know of Bromide tests? Maybe it’s taking iodine and look for symptoms? Hair testing for mercury is controversial but it’s cheap and mine came back nil.

Reply

Lynne Farrow July 13, 2013 at 7:15 AM

Kari,

Many people are sensitive to iodine’s capacity for detoxification. They need to start at very low doses to avoid detox side effects. I advocate for these people because they are often intimidated in the online iodine support communities and give up. The stakes for giving up could be high so we want to create a workable strategy for sensitive people.

Here’s a technique that has worked for many: http://www.lynnefarrow.net/sensitive
Be sure to use the rest of The Iodine Protocol along with the heel dosing–especially the salt water loading.

Good luck,
Lynne

Reply

Beth July 14, 2013 at 1:58 PM

I also wanted to chime in and say how much iodine has helped me. I started taking it because I read that it could help w/ovarian cysts, which I had started getting every month during ovulation. I haven’t felt the telltale twinge of pain of a cyst since I began supplementing with iodine. I also began at much too high of a dose and had a VERY strong bromine detox. I got bromoderma, a lot of bloat, and bad anxiety. Thankfully I ran across the iodine thread on Mark’s Daily Apple which advocated starting at VERY small dosages. I started with Lugol’s 5% and I had to dilute 1 drop in 1 cup of water and would drink an ounce of it every day, then the next week I would increase it to 2 ounces, etc., until I very slowly worked my way up to being able to increase by drops. I had been going through a horrible depression when I began iodine, and that quickly went away and I was left with a renewed sense of well-being, contentment and energy. I was so toxic that it took me a very long time to work up to higher dosages, but now I’m in the 80mg range (I take 1 50 mg Iodoral and add on the Lugol’s drops). If I go much higher, I actually have a hard time falling asleep because I have too much energy! So I’m listening to my body and not going any higher right now.
Another unexpected side effect was 2 stubborn warts cleared up, which I’d had for years. One I’d even had burned off at one point, but it came back. There are no sign of them now. If I get sick, which is very rare now, increasing my dosage temporarily knocks it right out. My core temperature also increased. It was always around 96 or 97, and I was cold all the time – I had a small space heater at work which I had on all day every day. Now my temperature is in the 98s and I’m very comfortable. I can’t remember the last time I had to turn on my heater at work.Iodine is truly amazing.

Reply

Andrea July 14, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Awesome! What supporting supplements do you find helpful?

Reply

Beth July 15, 2013 at 8:05 AM

I was initially taking all of them – selenium, magnesium, B2 and B3. I did the salt loading protocol when my bromine detox got really bad, but I didn’t actually find that it helped. I laid off of the iodine for a little while and took 600 mgs of N-A-C twice a day until the bromoderma cleared up (that helped a LOT!). Now I just take selenium and magnesium, although I did recently add a B Complex back in.

Reply

Lynn Razaitis July 14, 2013 at 6:39 PM

Andrea you can find a list of support supplements in Lynne’s book “The Iodine Crisis” as well as on these websites: http://breastcancerchoices.org/iprotocol.html and it’s sister site
http://iodineresearch.com/supplementation.html. We also have a facebook discussion group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/309122002556036/

You can google “yahoo groups iodine” and “curezone iodine supplementation” for other discussion groups for more information.

Reply

Lynn Razaitis July 14, 2013 at 6:40 PM

Forgot to add the facebook group is called “Iodine Workshop” if the link I gave doesn’t get you there.

Reply

Amanda July 15, 2013 at 3:55 AM

I am very interested to know how much iodine the average person should take? Should we all supplement with it since our food is so depleted of it? If so, how much?

Reply

Beth July 15, 2013 at 8:09 AM

Hopefully Lynn will chime in as well, but I personally think that the vast majority of Americans are probably iodine deficient. I don’t think there is a set number for everyone as to how much to take – 50 mgs seems to be the magic to number to shoot for, and then to stay at that dose for awhile until you’re no longer deficient, and then drop down to a maintenance dose. However I have heard of a lot of people that take much more than that and also stay at those higher doses, especially if they are dealing with specific health issues (as I am). And I find that I just feel better at the higher doses, and thankfully my body lets me know if I’m taking too much, or increasing too fast, etc.

Reply

Amanda July 15, 2013 at 8:43 AM

Thanks, Beth. I am interested in supplementing, but not sure how I should begin if I’m currently breast feeding.

Reply

Lynne Farrow July 15, 2013 at 9:40 AM

Amanda and Beth,

The doctors who study iodine therapy came up with 50 mgs after a lot of research. I saw a presentation on this subject at the 2007 Iodine Conference. There’s no one ideal dosage but 50 mg seems to be what most people feel good on. Tho, some take much more and some take less.

I took 25 mg for a year and then went up to a steady 50 mg for several years. I stayed at 50 mg, assuming that because I was so small, that I couldn’t possibly need more. Wrong! As an experiment, I went up to 75 mgs a little over a year ago and the minor Shingles and canker sore outbreaks I had been getting several times a year completely stopped.

You might join one of the Iodine Online groups to exchange questions and info. There are many people of all alevels of iodine expertise available to share with. Try Iodine Workshop on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/groups/309122002556036/

Best to you…

Reply

Kristie July 18, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Would whole food B vitamins and vitamin C work as well as the supplements recommended? Especially if mercury toxicity is a factor?

Reply

Kristie July 19, 2013 at 4:54 AM

I meant with the iodine of course! I looked up the recommended supplements and I was wondering if whole food vitamins would work as companion nutrients.

Reply

Sheila July 18, 2013 at 1:59 PM

Confused as I have Hashimoto’s. I get hyper and feel off when I take Iodine…Dr. Karazian firmly says no iodine for people with this auto-immune condition. Dr. Brownstein says otherwise… ??

Reply

Beth July 18, 2013 at 2:11 PM

Hi Sheila. Check out anja’s comment farther up. She has Hashi’s and takes 125mg of iodine a day. People with Hashimoto’s have to make sure to take selenium with their iodine. Everyone should, actually, but it’s even more important for people with Hashi’s.

Reply

Ellen August 2, 2013 at 9:13 AM

What about drinking fish stock mafe with whole carcasses, heads and all? Anyone know if this could supplement enough for a maintenance dose for an otherwise healthy person? Or is taking a supplement the only way to go?

Reply

Lynne Farrow September 11, 2013 at 6:26 AM

I just received a report from a therapist about how iodine pulled her out of a deep depression and fatigue. She was so desperate that she asked for electro shock therapy. Luckily, the doctor refused. Then she found iodine.

Here’s her report:

http://www.lynnefarrow.net/mentalhealth

Reply

CRYSTAL WOGAN November 20, 2014 at 7:05 AM

Hi Lynne,
I do not know which Website to go on. I live in England & I tried Breast Cancer Choices, but the Email failed.
I have been on the Curezon Site, and one of the warnings was to not take iodine if you are on Pescription Medication, as they contain FLUORIDE, and the iodine blocks this, leading to the Medication not being elimated, causing a possible overdose situation.
I am currently on Diazepam 7 1/2mg, Amitriptyline 60mg and Cozaar Losartan Potassium 50mg.
I cannot find Fluoride among the ingredients, but that does not mean it is not there, as these drug companies seem to get away with so much.
I was put on first 2 long before I knew of the dangers (due to having a son with brain damage), and now Cozaar to control high blood pressure.
My Doctor, Breast Surgeon & Oncologist do not have a clue re alternative med & just follow protocol. I also do not know of anybody I can go to here.
The Cozaar also, as far as I know, means I cannot have Potassium Iodide, as would spike Potassium levels too high.
I was going to take Iodoral, but don’t think I can now. It is so frustrating, I did not want the Cozaar in the first place. I was given Anastrozole, but came off it after a pounding heart, which they deny is anything to do with it, & are now threatening Tamoxifen which I will not take.
Please can you help me.
Bless you & thank you,
Crystal.

Reply

CRYSTAL WOGAN December 5, 2014 at 5:43 AM

Hi Lynne,
I have emailed Breast Cancer Choices for advice a couple of times, but no reply.
If they cannot help me, could you please tell me who I could go to for help.
I am worried something else is starting.
Crystal Wogan.

Reply

Sylvia Milward December 15, 2014 at 6:14 AM

Hi Lynne
I have your book and have now been taking iodine 150mg selenium and magnesium and krill oil also half a teaspoon vit c since July but I still do not have a lot of energy but I also have this ravenous hunger can you help me with this also take the vits you talk about vit d3, would I still have to take vit b2 and bit b3, I also take zinc

I started to take coconut oil but I think I took to much at first now cut it down to half a tsp a day I am 73 and I need as much help as possible re computer
Warm regards
Sylvia

Reply

Lynne Farrow December 16, 2014 at 9:51 AM

Hello Sylvia,

You may need to take more of the ATP Cofactors. Those vits in that exact ratio seem to really mobilize iodine into the cells and bromide out. We are learning that when you raise iodine to the higher levels, more ATP helps the absorption.

Please join the Iodine Workshop Facebook Group for great informations. https://www.facebook.com/groups/IodineWorkshop/

Good luck to you,
Lynne

Reply

Sue June 10, 2016 at 4:50 PM

Dear Lynne,
I have a low thyroid, and would the Iodine drops or pills help me, I also have high
cholesterol and I take Prevastatin, I don’t like the idea of taking a statin drug,I would like to get off them.
I spoke to a nurse friend and he told me the success he has had taking iodine and his cholesterol and blood pressure has dropped significantly. He also has dropped extra weight that he was carrying.

Reply

Lynne Farrow June 11, 2016 at 1:04 PM

Sue,

High cholesterol levels were always considered a “marker” — or symptom of hypothyroid disease. The best place to start learning how to supplement iodine to nourish your thyroid is on the Facebook Group, Iodine Workshop. You will learn the whole Iodine Protocol there, plus get help.

Many people have helped normalize their cholesterol when they find they just have an iodine deficiency, not a cardiac condition.

Thanks for the great question.

Lynne

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: